Conditional Sentences Comparison & Mixed Conditionals: The Perfect Holiday (English / ESL Video)

Conditional Sentences Comparison & Mixed Conditionals: The Perfect Holiday (English / ESL Video)


Synopsis of English / ESL Video

Follow Lesley on his perfect getaway holiday and compare the various forms of conditional sentences & mixed conditionals to learn their similarities & differences. (Upper-intermediate level)


Title of English / ESL Video

The Perfect Holiday

Target English Grammar

Conditional Sentences Comparison: First conditional, second conditional, third conditional, zero conditional and mixed conditionals.
– Conditional sentences / conditional clauses / if clause
– If clause + result clause / clauses of result
– Also known as:
– condition clause + consequence clause
– subordinate clause + main clause / other clause
– dependent clause + independent clause.

Student Proficiency Level

Upper-intermediate level grammar

Suggested Courses

General English and English for Hotel and Tourism.

Instructions

– Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first.
– Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs).

Summary of English Grammar: Conditional Sentences and Mixed Conditionals

Approximate chronological order:

Elicitation: Zero Conditional

– We use the zero conditional to talk about things which are always or generally true, or things which always happen as a result of something else.
– Example: If I’m late, my boss gets angry.

Elicitation: Second Conditional

– We use the second conditional to talk about present or future hypothetical situations and their present or future consequences.
– Example: If I were rich, I’d buy a new car.

Elicitation: First Conditional

– We use the first conditional to talk about possible present or future situations and their future consequences.
– Example: If my holiday request gets approved, I’ll go to Thailand.

Elicitation: Third Conditional

– We use the third conditional to talk about past hypothetical situations and their past consequences.
– Example: If I had taken a taxi, I wouldn’t have missed my flight.

Elicitation: Mixed Third + Second Conditional

– If clause (third conditional about the past) + result clause (second conditional about the present or future)
– We use this to talk about past hypothetical situations and their present or future consequences.
– Example: If I hadn’t missed my plane, I wouldn’t be in this situation!

Elicitation: Mixed Second + Third Conditional

– If clause (second conditional about something which is always true) + result clause (third conditional about the past)
– We use this to talk about hypothetical situations which are always true and their past consequences.
– Example: If I weren’t so careless, I wouldn’t have lost my wallet.

Conditional Forms: All Conditionals

– If clause + result clause, or
– Result clause + if clause

Form: Zero Conditional

– If + any present tense, + any present tense.
– Most common form: If + present simple, + present simple.

Form: First Conditional

– If + any present tense, + any future tense.
– Most common form: If + present simple, + future simple (will).

Form: Second Conditional

– If + past simple / past continuous, + present simple / present continuous (would).
– Most common form: If + past simple, + present simple (would).

Form: Third Conditional

– If + past perfect / past continuous, + present perfect / present continuous (would).
– Most common form: If + past perfect, + present perfect (would).

Form: Mixed Third and Second Conditional

– Third conditional (past) + second conditional (present / future).
– If + past perfect / past continuous, + present simple / present continuous (would).

Form: Mixed Second and Third Conditional

– Second conditional (always true) + third conditional (past)
– If + past simple / past continuous, + present perfect / present continuous (would)

Other Important Information:

– Using “unless” to replace “if”.
– Using future time clauses to replace “if” in first and zero conditionals.
– Using imperatives in the result clause.
– Using modal verbs in either clause.

Imperatives and Modal Verbs in the Result Clause of First and Zero Conditionals:

– Elicitation from students.
– Any first or zero conditional sentence with an imperative or a modal verb in the result clause is both a first and zero conditional sentence.
– Example: If you go on holiday, don’t forget your wallet. (Imperative)
– Example: If you go on holiday, you should remember to bring your wallet. (Modal verb)
– Both these sentences are both first and zero conditionals.

Comparison of all conditional forms using the same sentence:

– Zero conditional: If I eat too much, I get sick.
– First conditional: If I eat too much, I will get sick.
– Second conditional: If I ate too much, I would get sick.
– Third conditional: If I had eaten too much, I would have gotten sick.
– Mixed third and second conditional: If I had eaten too much, I would be sick right now/later.
– Mixed second and third conditional: If I always ate too much, I would have gotten sick a long time ago.


*** English / ESL Video: No Music Version ***

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