Modal Verbs: How to Survive a Real Life Zombie Apocalypse (English / ESL Video)

Modal Verbs: How to Survive a Real Life Zombie Apocalypse (English / ESL Video)


Synopsis of English / ESL Video

WARNING: In the likely event of a world-ending zombie apocalypse, watch this video & teach students modal verbs and zombie survival skills! It’s every man for himself! (Intermediate level)


Title of English / ESL Video

How to Survive a Real Life Zombie Apocalypse

Target English Grammar

Modal verbs of obligation, no obligation, advice, suggestions and options, prohibition, permission and strong recommendation.
Also known as:
– Modals.
– Modal auxiliaries.
– Modal auxiliary verbs.
– Modal helping verbs.
– Modal words.
Target words and phrases: have to, don’t have to, must, mustn’t, allowed to, not allowed to, can, can’t, should, shouldn’t, ought to.

Student Proficiency Level

Intermediate level grammar

Suggested Courses

General English and Zombie Survival crash courses.

Instructions

– Play the video in class after delivering a warm-up activity first.
– Pause the video whenever the narrator asks students a question to give students time to answer. For example, after elicitations and concept checking questions (CCQs).

Summary of English Grammar: Modal Verbs

Approximate chronological order:

Story

– Starts: 0:00
– Ends: 3:44

Rules and Explanation

– Starts: 3:45
– Ends: 5:45

Meaning / Function (Definition)

Target grammar can be used for obligation, no obligation, advice, suggestions and options, prohibition, permission and strong recommendations.

Uses / Pragmatics

Obligation: must, have to, have got to:
– Example sentence 1: You have to follow the Rule of Threes.
– Example sentence 2: You must find a place with fresh air.
*Must and have to have very similar meanings.
No obligation: don’t have to.
– Example sentence: You don’t have to be the fastest runner.
Prohibition: mustn’t, not allowed to, can’t.
– Example sentence 1: You mustn’t venture too far from your home.
– Example sentence 2: Make sure you use your left hand. Otherwise, you won’t be allowed to eat at the dining table.
*Must and have to have very similar meanings, but mustn’t and don’t have to have completely different meanings.
Permission: can, allowed to.
– Example sentence: Just because you’re allowed to enter creepy, old, abandoned buildings, doesn’t mean you should.
Advice, suggestions and opinions: should, shouldn’t, ought to.
– Example sentence 1: If you run over someone in your car at night, you shouldn’t stop and check to see if they’re ok.
– Example sentence 2: You should‘ve told me earlier.
Strong recommendations: must, have to, have got to.
– Example sentence: You‘ve got to try living on a boat.
Other Phrases for Advice, Suggestions and Opinions: You’ll want to, it’s in your best interest, take my advice.
– Example sentence 1: If it’s a zombie, you’ll want to keep driving.
– Example sentence 2: Either way, it’s in your best interest to keep on driving.
– Example sentence 3: So if you don’t want to be dead, take my advice

*** English / ESL Video: No Music Version ***

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